fall through space out of mind

ask   | here is my art blog | my face | yellow things
pixie! lv.21, queer, non-binary, Brighton UK, vegan.

doe-jo:

here is page 1 of my art journal! every flower bunch was individually cut from various magazines. i had to blur out all my info but it’s still really pretty and i’m pretty proud of it. it took a long time.

doe-jo:

here is page 1 of my art journal! every flower bunch was individually cut from various magazines. i had to blur out all my info but it’s still really pretty and i’m pretty proud of it. it took a long time.

— 58 minutes ago with 3 notes

sashaychantea:

lady-redrum:

ramonaflowersxxxxxxx:

ctgraphy:

And don’t underestimate the importance of BODY LANGUAGE
Cosplayer: srawr
The Little Mermaid
ACEN 2014

lady-redrum

YES.

Oh this is goooood

(via hantisedeloubli)

— 1 day ago with 14171 notes
#cosplay  #the little mermaid  #ursula 
"Here is how the internship scam works. It’s not about a “skills” gap. It’s about a morality gap.

1) Make higher education worthless by redefining “skill” as a specific corporate contribution. Tell young people they have no skills.

2) With “skill” irrelevant, require experience. Make internship sole path to experience. Make internships unpaid, locking out all but rich.

3) End on the job training for entry level jobs. Educated told skills are irrelevant. Uneducated told they have no way to obtain skills.

4) As wealthy progress on professional career path, middle and lower class youth take service jobs to pay off massive educational debt.

5) Make these part-time jobs not “count” on resume. Hire on prestige, not skill or education. Punish those who need to work to survive.

6) Punish young people who never found any kind of work the hardest. Make them untouchables — unhireable.

7) Tell wealthy people they are “privileged” to be working 40 hrs/week for free. Don’t tell them what kind of “privileged” it is.

8) Make status quo commentary written by unpaid interns or people hiring unpaid interns. They will tell you it’s your fault.

9) Young people, it is not your fault. Speak out. Fight back. Bankrupt the prestige economy."

The moral bankruptcy of the internship economy | Sarah Kendzior (via brutereason)

solarbird added: see also the intrinsic fraud of the prestigious internship. (via solarbird)

this comes from the top rope.

(via bainard)

I pretty much hit reblog on this after point 1 alone.

(via tomewing)

(via newwavefeminism)

— 1 day ago with 47500 notes

science-sexual:

shychemist:

nikzstar:

marxvx:

assdownloader:

"don’t support nestle!" shouts the liberal on the computer made from parts manufactured at foxconn

consumer activism is a lie, see you in hell or in communism

lmao try boycotting a brand in monopoly capitalism

image

I wish the picture was better because this is awesome and really proves how hard it would be to boycott certain companies in this day and age where they have a hand in almost everything.

Here’s a much larger version of the graphic above.

It’s kind of surreal to see that laid out like that. 

(via celestialqueer)

— 1 day ago with 16029 notes
"A woman is asked why she only does films about women. But men are never asked why they only do films about men."

Margaretha Von Tratta (via nuttersandcutters)

On demande aux femmes pourquoi elles ne font que des films à propos des femmes. Mais on ne demande pas aux hommes pourquoi ils ne font que des films sur les hommes.

(via jeunefeministe)

(via carrotwitch)

— 2 days ago with 1721 notes
novawerewolf:

SO QUIT DRAWING THEM THIN!! Did you know you can be fat and sexy? It’s true!! Every size is adorable and embracing it makes everyone feel better instead of feeling cast away for who they are.

novawerewolf:

SO QUIT DRAWING THEM THIN!! Did you know you can be fat and sexy? It’s true!! Every size is adorable and embracing it makes everyone feel better instead of feeling cast away for who they are.

(via tratakataka)

— 2 days ago with 2648 notes

womanontheedgeoftyne:

on the “its acceptable for women to wear men’s clothes but not men to wear  women’s clothes” thing- its always forgotten that women and girls have been fighting in small but organised ways to wear “masculine” (mostly read practical) clothing from at least the 1870s.  I know women in their 80s and girls in their tweens who at some time in their life have organised in order to wear the clothes they want - from making petitions to persuade their school to let them wear shorts not gym skirts, to trade union organising at work to make sure overalls and workboots are available in women’s sizes, to being the first women in the office to wear trousers, to just turning up at social events in the clothes they want to wear - and getting solidarity from other women doing the same thing - and of course not forgetting the women who risked violence, losing their job or families, or being arresting for cross-dressing laws because of what they wore.

There just hasn’t been such a widespread and longstanding organised push from men to wear skirts or other clothes coded feminine in everyday life.  That isn’t women’s fault.

(via affair)

— 4 days ago with 286 notes

soulgems:

I can’t believe they named the planets after all the sailor scouts

(via notradical-contingency)

— 4 days ago with 62066 notes

yamino:

shugarskull:

Yeon Woo Jhi

*fans self*

(Source: fitgrills)

— 4 days ago with 21240 notes
"

A thought experiment: Imagine how people might react if Taylor Swift released an album made up entirely of songs about wishing she could get back together with one of her exes.

We’d hear things like: “She can’t let go. She’s clingy. She’s irrational. She’s crazy.” Men would have a field day comparing her to their own “crazy” exes.

Yet when Robin Thicke released “Paula” – a plea for reconciliation with his ex-wife Paula Patton disguised as an LP — he was called incoherent, obsessed, heartfelt and, in particular, creepy.

But you didn’t hear men calling him “crazy” — even though he used it as the title of one of tracks.

No, “crazy” is typically held in reserve for women’s behavior. Men might be obsessed, driven, confused or upset. But we don’t get called “crazy” — at least not the way men reflexively label women as such.

“Crazy” is one of the five deadly words guys use to shame women into compliance. The others: Fat. Ugly. Slutty. Bitchy. They sum up the supposedly worst things a woman can be.

WHAT WE REALLY MEAN BY “CRAZY” IS: “SHE WAS UPSET, AND I DIDN’T WANT HER TO BE.”

“Crazy” is such a convenient word for men, perpetuating our sense of superiority. Men are logical; women are emotional. Emotion is the antithesis of logic. When women are too emotional, we say they are being irrational. Crazy. Wrong.

Women hear it all the time from men. “You’re overreacting,” we tell them. “Don’t worry about it so much, you’re over-thinking it.” “Don’t be so sensitive.” “Don’t be crazy.” It’s a form of gaslighting — telling women that their feelings are just wrong, that they don’t have the right to feel the way that they do. Minimizing somebody else’s feelings is a way of controlling them. If they no longer trust their own feelings and instincts, they come to rely on someone else to tell them how they’re supposed to feel.

Small wonder that abusers love to use this c-word. It’s a way of delegitimizing a woman’s authority over her own life.

Most men (#notallmen, #irony) aren’t abusers, but far too many of us reflexively call women crazy without thinking about it. We talk about how “crazy girl sex” is the best sex while we also warn men “don’t stick it in the crazy.” How I Met Your Mother warned us to watch out for “the crazy eyes” and how to process women on the “Crazy/Hot” scale. When we talk about why we broke up with our exes, we say, “She got crazy,” and our guy friends nod sagely, as if that explains everything.


Except what we’re really saying is: “She was upset, and I didn’t want her to be.”

Many men are socialized to be disconnected from our emotions — the only manly feelings we’re supposed to show are stoic silence or anger. We’re taught that to be emotional is to be feminine. As a result, we barely have a handle on our own emotions — meaning that we’re especially ill-equipped at dealing with someone else’s.

That’s where “crazy” comes in. It’s the all-purpose argument ender. Your girlfriend is upset that you didn’t call when you were going to be late? She’s being irrational. She wants you to spend time with her instead of out with the guys again? She’s being clingy. Your wife doesn’t like the long hours you’re spending with your attractive co-worker? She’s being oversensitive.

As soon as the “crazy” card is in play, women are put on the defensive. It derails the discussion from what she’s saying to how she’s saying it. We insist that someone can’t be emotional and rational at the same time, so she has to prove that she’s not being irrational. Anything she says to the contrary can just be used as evidence against her.

More often than not, I suspect, most men don’t realize what we’re saying when we call a woman crazy. Not only does it stigmatize people who have legitimate mental health issues, but it tells women that they don’t understand their own emotions, that their very real concerns and issues are secondary to men’s comfort. And it absolves men from having to take responsibility for how we make others feel.

In the professional world, we’ve had debates over labels like “bossy” and “brusque,” so often used to describe women, not men. In our interpersonal relationships and conversations, “crazy” is the adjective that needs to go.

"
Men really need to stop calling women crazy - Harris O’Malley (via hello-lilianab)

(Source: Washington Post, via dendrami)

— 4 days ago with 10209 notes

fer1972:

Upcycled Star Wars Junk Tech Busts by Gabriel Dishaw 

Using found objects from typewriters, adding machines and old computers, I take the items people no longer have use for and I carefully disassembling these items and then reassemble these together using metal wire creating my Junk Art.

(via horrorproportions)

— 4 days ago with 713 notes
#star wars 

cishettears:

liberal feminism more like “capitalism: it’s not just for boys”

(via horrorproportions)

— 4 days ago with 3749 notes